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Splitting Black-eyed Susan - Indian Summer

PostPosted: Jul 16, 2012 1:12 pm
by jerryshenk
Last summer, we got a Black-eyed Susan of the Indian Summer variety. We got two addtional ones this summer. It has larger blooms and they hold on for quite a long time...much longer than other varieties. One other difference, they don't seem to spread the same. The "normal" ones, you can dig up a clump, plant 'em and you've doubled your flowers. These seems like one big plant. How to propogate these?

Image
DSC_20120716_135016_bs2 by jerryshenk, on Flickr

Re: Splitting Black-eyed Susan - Indian Summer

PostPosted: Jun 27, 2013 7:44 am
by jerryshenk
Update:
These things don't seem to be propagating themselves. I initially planted one and then the following summer planted 2 more. The 3rd year (this year), the initial plant did not come back. There is mulch around them so I guess that could hinder reseeding but it is fairly thin. I did not deadhead them toward the end of summer to allow self-seeding. I also have some "normal" Black-eyed Susan at another location...they are reseeding/spreading just fine.

I've done some research - sounds like the definition of perennial is that it will come back the 2nd year and I guess biannual plants will only come back the 2nd year whereas perennials might come back more than that. I'm guessing that this is a hybrid that isn't quite as prolific as the native variety...actually, perhaps it's sterile.

So, my main question - should I just plan on buying one of these plants every year to replace the ones that will eventually die off?

Re: Splitting Black-eyed Susan - Indian Summer

PostPosted: Jun 27, 2013 8:04 am
by Chris_W
Hi Jerry,

Indian Summer is one of the hirta types that really aren't perennials (they are considered a very short lived perennial or biennial) so I've never bothered to try them myself. Yes, the mulch might be stopping seedlings from forming, so I suggest collecting seeds yourself. Let them flower and don't deadhead all of them, then as they are almost ripe cut them down and put them in paper lunch bags. Sow the seed outdoors in the fall and they should sprout the following spring.

I've also heard that if you don't let them flower late in the fall it can encourage more basal growth to help it survive the winter. But I've only heard this and have no proof that it helps, so just maybe a suggestion.

Re: Splitting Black-eyed Susan - Indian Summer

PostPosted: Jun 27, 2013 8:57 am
by jerryshenk
Thanks - that confirms what I suspected.

Re: Splitting Black-eyed Susan - Indian Summer

PostPosted: Jun 30, 2013 12:30 pm
by Pattyw5
Hi Jerry,
The hirta type nerver come back here in Illnois but do reliably reseed. That is until I put mulch down where they grew. That was the last time I saw them. They don't reseed true to mother plant. It was how ever fun to see what flowers came up each year. With each plant being different from the other. If that would be your only hirta plant in your yard it may be a seed grown stain and come back true. Try leaving some bare ground for your seeds.