Transplanting Grass

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Transplanting Grass

Postby JaneG » Apr 07, 2008 1:06 pm

A little advice needed here - - I have two clumps of zebra grass that I would like to transplant. They have been in their current location for 4 seasons (I think) and from the original 1 gal pots they are now 2 feet or so in diameter.

Is now a good time to move them, before they really take off later in the spring. There isn't any new growth *yet*.

Second, what's it going to take to get these out of the ground? They are very dense clumps and I'm wondering what the root system is going to be like when I try to dig them out.

What are the chances I will succeed? Or am I going to kill them if I try?

Once I get them out of the ground could I hack a spade down the middle and split them?

I have several clumps of different grasses and really like them in the landscape, but don't really know anything about working with them.

Thanks!
JaneG
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Postby Chris_W » Apr 07, 2008 2:21 pm

Hi Jane,

This is the best time to move and divide them, if they aren't too big.

The Miscanthus are warm season growers so they put out new growth in the summer. When I transplant them I make sure the new shoots are buried and then mulch them afterward, which helps keep them cool and moist.

As for getting these out? Do you have a steel shovel? That's all I use on grasses as regular shovels just don't cut it. If it really has to be done, go all the way around and dig a trench as if you were moving a big tree. Once you get the clump cleared so you can see it and remove it I like to spray off as much dirt as I can, then take one of those cheap tree saws to the root mass - and the saw will get worn down and have to be thrown away afterward.

Some use a chainsaw, but again, this will kill a chainsaw blade.

Other's report using an axe. It is really just going to depend on how big these clumps are. Sometimes a flat spade is all it takes.

Hope that helps a little. Good luck.

Chris
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Postby caliloo » Apr 07, 2008 2:31 pm

:lol: I was going to suggest a chain saw but Chris beat me to it :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

When you do attack these clumps, make sure someone has a video camera rolling - it might net you $10K on Americas Funniest Home Videos :eek: :lol: :lol: :lol:

But seriously - they are a bear to chop apart so any means you can manage is fine. Do not worry about "saving" roots or anything, just wrestle them out of the ground and hack away!

Alexa
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Postby JaneG » Apr 08, 2008 8:11 pm

Thanks for the advice, Chris and Alexa. It's good to know this is the best time to do it, and that I don't have to be extra gentle with them.

Perhaps this weekend, if the weather clears up, I'll get a good work out moving these guys! :roll:

And NO, there won't be any video cameras rolling!! :lol:
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Re: Transplanting Grass

Postby mastila » Nov 08, 2008 6:06 am

does such trasplantation has anything to do with natural water requirement, as in like a weather based kind of thing?
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